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Salem Witch Museum Named One of Massachusetts’ Top 5 Group Attractions

0 Comments | This entry was posted on Dec 12 2014

In the 2015 American Bus Association’s (ABA) Motor Coach Marketer the Salem Witch Museum was named one of Massachusetts’ top 5 group attractions.  ABA’s Marketer is the official guide for the motor coach and travel industry.

Did your favorites make the list? swm-with-motor-coach

TOP 5 ATTRACTIONS

The Freedom Trail

Whale Watches

Salem Witch Museum

Six Flags New England

Yankee Candle

Top 5 TOURISM DESTINATIONS

Boston/Cambridge & Greater Boston

Plymouth & Cape Cod

Berkshire County

Greater Springfield

Salem & the North Shore

TOP 5 EVENTS

Cape Cod Maritime Days, Cape Cod, May

North End Festivals, Boston, July – August

Tanglewood Jazz Festival, September

Working Waterfront Festival, New Bedford, September

Eastern States Exposition/The Big E, West Springfield, October

Witch Trials Weekly: February 1692

0 Comments | This entry was posted on Apr 04 2014

Witch Trials Weekly: Video 5, February 12th through February 18th

Church Control

Witch Trials Weekly: Video 6, February 19th through February 25th

The First Examinations


Witch Trials Weekly: Video 7, February 26th through March 3rd

Diagnosis, Witch Cake, and the Spread of the Evil Hand

2014 January Spruce Up Hours

0 Comments | This entry was posted on Jan 02 2014

It’s that time of year again – here at the Salem Witch Museum we like to make the most of the season by sprucing up in January.

We’ll be closed Monday through Friday January 6th through 10th and again January 13th through the 17th.

We’ll reopen the museum and gift shop Saturdays and Sundays.  Reopen daily on January 18th.

If you have any questions, please feel free to call us at 978-744-1692.

paint

Meet the Author & Book Signing – Marilynne K. Roach

0 Comments | This entry was posted on Jul 31 2013

six-women_0 Six Women of Salem: The Untold Story of the Accused and their Accusers in the Salem Witch Trials

Date:                            October 3, 2013

Time:                          6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Admission:                   Free

For reservations email: faq@salemwitchmuseum.com

Or call:                          978.744.1692

Where:                         Salem Witch Museum

19 ½ Washington Square North

Salem, MA  01970

In Six Women of Salem: The Untold Story of the Accused and their Accusers in the Salem Witch Trials, author and historian, Marilynne K. Roach chronicles the lives of six specific women involved in the witch hunt who represent the accusers, the accused, or both, and uses their unique stories to illuminate the larger crisis of the trials. Roach works to reconstruct the events of the trials, bringing to life this representative group of women, and examines the entire experience of the Salem Witch Trials through the eyes of those who lived through the hysteria and delivers a historically intimate narrative that gives readers a front row seat to this desperate and dangerous time in history.

Marilynne K. Roach works as both a historian and illustrator. Her illustrations, how-to articles, and travel pieces have been featured in the Boston Globe. She’s lectured to groups ranging in age from kindergarteners to senior citizens, and is the author of the classic The Salem Witch Trials: A Day-by-Day Chronicle of a Community Under Siege.

What can we learn from American Muslims?

0 Comments | This entry was posted on Jul 13 2013

Last year Kemal Argon, a contributor to Huffington Post, wondered What Can The Salem Witch Museum Teach American Muslims? . Yet this spring after the Boston Marathon bombing a few of our staff, reeling with the aftermath of the horrific events so close to home and family, expressed apprehension about discussing religious, cultural, sexual, gender and racial tolerance in our second exhibit.

tolerance-word-cloud-ii

Fear  +  Trigger  = Scapegoat

Our second exhibit Witches Evolving Perceptions looks at the evolution of folklore and stereotypes that lead to scapegoating, especially of those accused of witchcraft in Essex County 1692.  The formula for a witch hunt fits to explain other scapegoating events, for example the McCarthy hearings in the United States in the 1950’s.

Salem 1692

Fear:  God/Devil

Trigger:  Dr. Griggs

Scapegoats:  150 Townspeople

Japanese-American Internment 1942

Fear:  Imperial Japan

Trigger:  Pearl Harbor

Scapegoats:  100,000 +/- Japanese Americans put in internment camps

McCarthyism  ~1950-1956

Fear:  Communism

Trigger:  HUAC / Senator Joseph McCarthy

Scapegoats:  Blacklisted citizens

AIDS Epidemic Outbreak  1980’s

Fear:  Infection

Trigger: HIV/AIDS

Scapegoats:  Gay community

There are many other examples of witch hunting in the United States and elsewhere in the world throughout history.  Using the formula, it could be said that the treatment of law abiding Muslim-Americans as terrorists in a post-9/11 environment certainly follows.

When the Boston Marathon bombing occurred this spring, one unforeseen result was that tourists visiting the city were rerouted elsewhere, including to Salem; the Salem Witch Museum hosted several unscheduled tour groups, even as the Boston police were chasing down the suspects, and most people in the area were single-minded in their concern.   It was a surreal day where citizens of the metro Boston area were unified in prayer of sorts, while political and social tensions were escalating.

A couple members of our staff struggled with discussing tolerance in our second exhibit that day.  While there were those who felt that Muslims as a whole should not be allowed to immigrate to the United States, others believed that this was the precisely the time to hold fast to our commitment to teach the lessons of intolerance.

To address the conflict, staff members researched various media for a broad sample of opinions on the subject of Muslims in America:  some pro, some con.  We realized that this complicated issue brought to mind the very real conflict between our moral ideals and our naturally occurring human fears and prejudices.  Today as much as in 1692.

We found the research and following discussions somewhat unsatisfying, as none of the opinions expressed were coming from the very people whose presence in our midst we were examining.  Museum director, Tina Jordan, reached out to our Education Director Emerita, Alison D’Amario, to help us get a more personal view of the issue.  Alison has taught English  at the Immigrant Learning Center, Malden, MA through which she’s been afforded a genuine  familiarity with – unedited by mass media –  the daily lives and stories of people, including Muslims, who have decided to live in the United States.

. . . . . to be continued. . . . .

In part II, we’ll recap a moving evening of discussion on the topic of the treatment of Muslims in the Boston area after the fateful marathon bombing of this spring.

Marilynne Roach Signs Copies of Day-By-Day Chronicle

0 Comments | This entry was posted on Apr 23 2013

We have the privilege of working closely with historian Marilynne Roach on many projects.  She answers nuanced questions about the Salem witch trials, helping our staff interpret the underpinnings of the events, and is a perpetual inspiration in understanding what can be learned from Essex County’s 1692 experience.

If you don’t yet own a copy of The Salem Witch Trials:  A Day-By-Day Chronicle of a Community Under Siege, now is your chance to get one of 20 remaining signed copies of the book.

In our shop or online, while supplies last!

marilynne-signing-books

We Heart Local Art

0 Comments | This entry was posted on Mar 07 2013

If you follow our blog you know how much we love local arts and artisans.  We do our part to sustain North Shore crafters by providing marketing and financial support to the creative community and by carrying their work in our museum store.  We proudly sponsor events like the Salem Film Fest, Mass Poetry Festival, and Salem Literary Fest just to name a few.

Dot's Pots Window Lanterns When visitors from distant places come to Salem, naturally they want to take a bit of their individual experience back home with them.  Local art is not only a means for our neighbors to live creative, compassionate lives, but items traveling back to visitors’ homelands spreads our culture and shares the flavor of our area.  So when an artisan like Marblehead resident Dorothy Arthur of Dot’s Pots infuses a beautiful piece of functional art with architectural essence – such as her lanterns of prominent windows – the connection between place and the visitor is steeped even stronger.

~ ~ ~

From MAA newsletter :

The Marblehead Arts Association-  Call for Works

Fine Art of Craft

March 16 – April 21

To see craft is to enter a world of wonderful things which can be challenging, beautiful, sometimes useful, tactile, artistic and extraordinary – and to understand and enjoy the care which has gone into their making.   Contemporary craft is about making hand crafted objects of art and ensures the highest standard of workmanship exhibiting a working knowledge of tools and materials.

The Marblehead Arts Association (MAA) is presenting “Fine Art of Craft”, an exhibit from March 16-April 21.  This juried exhibit invites both MAA and non-MAA artisans in the general categories of ceramics/pottery; fiber/textile; metalwork/silversmith; woodwork/furniture and glass and the creative overlap or blending of these mediums.  Jurying is based on creativity of design, quality of materials and attention to detail in overall workmanship and presentation.

For information and submission:  www.marbleheadarts.org

Surviving Nemo

0 Comments | This entry was posted on Feb 11 2013

After two relatively snow-free winters we were due for a doozy.  And Nemo delivered.

State and city governments made the call early on Thursday to keep people off roads Friday and through the weekend while cleanup crews dealt with, not multiple inches but, multiple feet in some areas.  Here at the Salem Witch Museum we opened for part of the day Friday, closing for the safety of our staff and visitors through to Sunday.  Folks must have had cabin fever because we had a number more visitors than usual once we reopened.  The bad news is that Salem’s So Sweet ice sculptures couldn’t be delivered as planned; the good news is that we’re essentially rescheduling the festivities to this upcoming weekend.

Driving through labyrinths of snowbanks makes travel still slow going, and finding parking can take even more time. For the next day or so it’s probably a good idea to give ourselves a head start if we need to be somewhere.  Which is fine, because it’ll give us a chance to enjoy the beauty of the season.

Thanks to Salem Witch Wiles for this photo:

2013-salem-witch-wiles-photo-of-swm-in-snow

January 2013 Hours

0 Comments | This entry was posted on Jan 02 2013

We’re open year-round.  But even we need to close the doors for a few days while we paint and clean carpets.  Here’s a list of our January hours:

Tuesday           1/1/13              Closed – New Year’s Day

Wednesday      1/2/13             Open 10am – 5pm

Thursday          1/3/13             Open 10am – 5pm

Friday              1/4/13               Open 10am – 5pm

Saturday           1/5/13             Open 10am – 5pm

Sunday             1/6/13              Open 10am – 5pm

Monday           1/7/13              Closed for Annual Spruce-up

Tuesday           1/8/13               Closed for Annual Spruce-up

Wednesday      1/9/13              Closed for Annual Spruce-up

Thursday          1/10/13           Closed for Annual Spruce-up

Friday              1/11/13              Closed for Annual Spruce-up

Saturday           1/12/13            Open 10am – 5pm

Sunday              1/13/13            Open 10am – 5pm

Monday           1/14/13            Closed for Annual Spruce-up

Tuesday           1/15/13            Closed for Annual Spruce-up

Wednesday      1/16/13            Closed for Annual Spruce-up

Thursday          1/17/13            Closed for Annual Spruce-up

Friday              1/18/13               Open 10am – 5pm

Saturday           1/19/13            Open 10am – 5pm

Sunday              1/20/13            Open 10am – 5pm

Monday           1/21/13            Open 10am – 5pm

Tuesday           1/22/13            Open 10am – 5pm

Wednesday      1/23/13            Open 10am – 5pm

Thursday          1/24/13            Open 10am – 5pm

Friday              1/25/13            Open 10am – 5pm

Saturday           1/26/13            Open 10am – 5pm

Sunday               1/27/13            Open 10am – 5pm

Open daily 10am – 5pm

January Breakfast (Book) Club: Dogtown

0 Comments | This entry was posted on Dec 26 2012

Dogtown Bookclub During the last months of each year our visitation shifts from October crowds to January trickles.  Our staff gladly take the quieter winters to catch up on pleasure reading, so we decided to host a book club or two this season.

The only rule for the book club was simply that we weren’t going to cover anything we’d “normally” read (i.e.  Salem witch trials related.)

Our first selection for the Salem Witch Museum Breakfast (Book) Club comes from Floor Manager Jay Menice.  A section of Gloucester, Massachusetts has been a fascination for him since Elyssa East published Dogtown: Death and Enchantment in a New England Ghost Town, a non-fiction examination of the mysterious history surrounding this some-say-enchanted place and a brutal crime set there.

Those of us who appreciate local authors have certainly encountered at least one title by Anita Diamant (the Red Tent, Good Harbor, et.al.), so we’re balancing the book club medley by including a work of historical fiction.  The Last Days of Dogtown portrays life in this early American mythical community  of witches, widows, orphans and spinsters.

In mid-January we’ll host a continental breakfast and book club discussion comparing and contrasting these two renditions of Dogtown.  If you’d like to join us, please email Stacy at stacyt@salemwitchmuseum.com for further details.

North Shore Community College, Poetry of Essex County: Dogtown