RSS

Reverend Increase Matther

0 Comments | This entry was posted on Sep 29 2010

Increase Mather “It were better that ten suspected witches should escape, than that one innocent person should be condemned.”

INCREASE MATHER (1639-1723)
An authoritative minister in Boston, President of Harvard College and close friend of Governor William Phips, his publication of Cases of Conscience illustrated his more moderate position on the witch trials.   He was also the father of Cotton Mather.

Learn more about Increase Mather and the Salem Witch trials online.

Shaquille O’Neal Visits the Salem Witch Museum

0 Comments | This entry was posted on Sep 28 2010

We have always been blessed to have some of the best visitors in the world, from all over the world!  As kind, insightful, intelligent and interesting as they are, most go through our museum and around Salem without crowds of people following them.  Though his visit to the Salem Witch Museum was low-key,  Shaquille O’Neal could hardly remain anonymous as he toured downtown Salem on Saturday. 

He’s clearly accustomed to being recognized and deals with the attention gracefully, so he posed for photos with fans throughout Salem.  One of the greatest names in basketball, Shaq is also one of the most sizable guys; but we are now among his biggest fans!

For a full recount and photos, please check out the Salem News article here.

Visit with Marilynne K. Roach

0 Comments | This entry was posted on Sep 22 2010

roach-witch-trials-book We were honored last month to host distinguished Salem witch trials scholar Marilynne Roach who has written, among other things, The Salem Witch Trials: A Day-by-Day Chronicle of a Community Under Siege.  After the crowds of summer visitors had left the museum for the evening, our staff gathered in the main auditorium for her lecture.  She described her years of extensive research in various document archives, writing several books, and answered our many questions. 

Ms. Roach first visited the Salem Witch Museum in 1973 and was inspired to launch her own investigation into the subject.  Combing over documents written in an antique dialect, she ascertained new details relevant to this well-studied period of Colonial New England history.  One of the more exciting moments of the research came , she told us, when she realized she’d discovered jailers invoices that had never before been acknowledged.  It’s now widely known that imprisoned accused-witches were billed for their stay! Read more »

Smithsonian Magazine’s Museum Day

0 Comments | This entry was posted on Sep 20 2010

Museum Day Ticket The Salem Witch Museum is proud to announce that it will be participating for the first time in the Smithsonian Magazine’s Museum Day – September 25th.

Museum day is an annual event hosted by Smithsonian Media in which participating museums across the country open their doors for free to anyone presenting a Museum Day Ticket.

The Museum Day Ticket provides free admission to one person plus a guest.

A ticket will gain entry to one participating museum.  Only an official Museum Day ticket is eligible for free entry.  Official tickets can be found on the Museum Day website. One ticket per household.

www.smithsonian.com/museumday

Frommer’s Visits

0 Comments | This entry was posted on Sep 15 2010

Carl Walsh of Frommer's We were honored yesterday by a visit from Frommer’s travel photographer Carl Walsh who spent nearly two hours capturing images throughout the museum. 

Frommer’s travel publications have been an indispensible part of any planned excursion touting that they explore destinations the way the locals do.  Founded in 1957 by Arthur Frommer with Europe on $5 a Day (those were the days!) it has expanded to offer over 300 guidebooks and the website www.frommers.com .  Today it is part of Wiley Publishing.

Carl has been a professional photographer for nearly 30 years and has earned credentials from some of the most renowned publications including Audubon, National Geographic Traveler and Time.  I especially admire the incredible composition of his published work seen at http://www.carlwalshphoto.com/photos/Published/ .  We’ll be sure to announce when we hear our piece has been published.  Meanwhile, if you’d like to see the range of Carl’s evocative work, check him out at www.carlwalsh.com .

Woda family visits from Nantes, France

0 Comments | This entry was posted on Sep 08 2010

This is a letter I received from a North Shore resident:

Hi Stacy,

Pierre, Oxana, Julie and Alice Woda This is the Woda family – Pierre, Oxana, Julie and Alice. They are from Nantes France and visiting the United States for the first time as a family. Their visit includes Boston, New York and Washington D.C. We have known them for a long time so, while they were here in Boston, we took them on a whale watch. I also told them about Salem, the Witch Trials and the Salem Witch Museum. The girls had never heard about the Witch Trials and were so interested that they talked their parents into forgoing some time in Boston to visit Salem. We took them to the Salem Witch Museum as a first stop so that they would get a good introduction to the story of the innocent victims. They all appreciated it and the girls especially liked using the French audio translation. The exhibit on the Evolving Perceptions of Witches generated some good discussion about the Wiccan religion as well. Afterwards, the Museum staff gave us instructions on how to get to the Salem Witch Memorial and the girls enjoyed looking at the old headstones. It was a great way to introduce the real story to our visitors.

Jeanne

Thank you, Jeanne, for sending your friends and for sharing their experience with us.

The Salem Witch Museum offers the main presentation translated into the following languages:

Cantonese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, Russian and Spanish.

Word of the Day: TOLERANCE

0 Comments | This entry was posted on Sep 02 2010

TOLERANCE – Recognition of and respect for the opinions, beliefs, or actions of others

Webster’s II New Riverside Ditionary, Revised Edition, Boston and New York, Houghton Mifflin Company, 1996